Developmental Politics Audiobook

Steve McIntosh’s Book Developmental Politics is Now Available as an Audiobook

The Institute for Cultural Evolution is pleased to announce the publication of Developmental Politics—How America Can Grow Into a Better Version of Itself  as an audiobook. This acclaimed book of political philosophy was written by Steve McIntosh, the Institute’s President and Co-Founder, and narrated by Josh Innerst. Originally published in print format in 2020, Developmental Politics has had a wide influence, and the book’s success has been instrumental in the growth of the Institute for Cultural Evolution as an organization. You can purchase the Developmental Politics audiobook here and listen to a sample below:

For the past twenty years, political and social commentator David Brooks has been an influential voice in American culture. At times, I’ve found his opinions to be timely and even inspirational. But I also often find myself balking or groaning at his views. The middle-brow accessibility of his writing helps him speak to a wide audience. Yet it’s this same accessibility that prevents him from being taken seriously in many intellectual circles. I do, however, take Brooks seriously and thus offer the following constructive critique.

Brooks occupies a rather unique niche in America’s cultural landscape. He rose to the top of the media’s commentariat in the early 2000s—gaining a high perch at both The New York Times and the PBS Newshour—by articulating a genteel form of moderate conservativism that the liberal clerisy found acceptable.

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Developmental Politics Videos and Podcasts

Greg Thomas is Interviewed by Glenn Loury on The Glenn Show

Institute for Cultural Evolution Senior Fellow, Greg Thomas, was recently interviewed by renowned conservative public intellectual and economist, Glenn Loury, on The Glenn Show. In this wide-ranging discussion, Glenn and Greg discuss Greg’s work leading the Jazz Leadership Project; the important black intellectual lineage that runs from Ralph Ellison and Albert Murray through Stanley Crouch; the Institute for Cultural Evolution; the developmental perspective on the culture war between traditionalism, modernity, and postmodernity; and much more. This stimulating discussion is a great example of how the developmental perspective on politics and culture is finally beginning to break into the mainstream national conversation.

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Developmental Politics Videos & Podcasts

Carter Phipps and Steve McIntosh Discuss “The Politics of Pride and Shame” on the Thinking Ahead Podcast

In this episode, Carter and Steve reflect on the current progressive inclination to highlight the wrongs of America’s past, in contrast to traditional patriotism. Certainly, there’s much to be ashamed of in our nation’s historical record, especially the horrors of slavery, segregation, and the violence perpetrated against Native American populations. But should we allow that shame to eclipse any expression of national pride? Inspired by Steve’s recent article “The Politics of Pride and Shame: Integrating 1776 and 1619,” this conversation explores a potent cultural polarity and asks how we might come to a more integrated synthesis.

The Daily Evolver

Frances Fukuyama: Trajectory Without Teleology

May 11, 2022

The Daily Evolver, with Jeff Salzman, examines current events through a developmental lens. New episodes are broadcast live on the Developmental Politics Facebook Group every Wednesday at 1pm MT (12pm PT, 2pm CT, and 3pm ET). If you miss it live, you will be able to watch edited episodes here at The Developmentalist.

Countering Objections

Responses to 10 Potential Objections to Our Developmental Political Approach

How can you justify your claims that the developmental perspective is “higher” or “more evolved”?
Anyone who wants to make the world a better place must be willing to point in the direction of “better.” Even those who advocate value relativism are, ironically, nevertheless claiming that their interpretation is superior. Developmentalists don’t claim to know what’s better with certainty or finality—we seek to continuously improve our definition of improvement itself. Nor do we claim that the developmental worldview is absolutely better than the worldviews of progressivism, modernism, or traditionalism. We advocate the developmental perspective primarily because it’s more inclusive, because it encompasses a wider range of values, and because it has greater explanatory power than these other value frames.

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Our Invitation to All Sides

The developmental approach to politics welcomes anyone, from anywhere on the political spectrum, willing to dialogue and seek solutions in good faith. To find out more about how developmentalism attempts to include your political values, please select the circle that best represents your political identity:

Click on each circle to read more

Progressive

Moderate Liberal

Fiscal Conservative

Social Conservative

 
 

Left

Right

Are You A Developmentalist?

Are You Post-Progressive?Take a 2-minute test of your political developmentalism, and see your “transcendence and inclusion score.”

This simple test asks you to select your level of agreement or disagreement with twelve political statements. The test results will indicate your inclusivity score, your transcendence score, and the overall extent of your developmental perspective on politics.
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“In this house, we trust science.”

How many times have I read that declaration on a lawn sign while walking down the street in Oakland or Berkeley or Austin or Boulder or Denver? It’s a political statement, a nod to the primacy of expertise in an era of “anything goes” when it comes to who we trust and who we believe.  At first glance, a societal rift between politics and truth would seem a dangerous trend that heralds a host of future problems. How can our politics succeed if we can’t trust science? Or is such expertise a thing of the past? In a world where every political position seems to have its own “expert” opinion makers, has expertise been fully polarized, never to be broadly trusted again?

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The Institute for Cultural Evolution is pleased to announce the publication of Developmental Politics—How America Can Grow Into a Better Version of Itself  as an audiobook. This acclaimed book of political philosophy was written by Steve McIntosh, the Institute’s President and Co-Founder, and narrated by Josh Innerst. Originally published in print format in 2020, Developmental Politics has had a wide influence, and the book’s success has been instrumental in the growth of the Institute for Cultural Evolution as an organization. 

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This series of graphics shows how America’s three major worldviews—progressive, modern, and traditional—map onto the familiar political spectrum of left and right. As journalist George Packer writes in The Atlantic Magazine, there are now “four Americas,” which he labels Just America, Smart America, Free America, and Real America. We identify these same categories as Caring Values, Fairness Values, Liberty Values, and Heritage Values.
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The Developmental Alliance (TDA) is a new nonprofit membership association for people who identify with the emerging developmental political perspective. Through conversation and fellowship, we are exploring and advancing a new kind of cultural and political higher ground.